Ny1: Touring Daniel Dromm’s District

NY1 VIDEO: The Road to City Hall’s Errol Louis visited City Councilman Daniel Dromm’s 25th city council district in Queens.

TimesLedger: Community Board Approves Car-Free Street Pilot




By Chauncey Alcorn


After dozens of protesters marched into the meeting and spoke passionately in support of the measure, Community Board 3 members Thursday night voted to support turning part of 78th St., adjacent to Travers Park, into a two-month play street this summer.

The board voted 27-9 with two abstentions in favor of supporting the play-street application of Jackson Heights Green Alliance, a community advocacy group fighting for more park space, which rallied about 150 supporters throughout the neighborhood Thursday and marched them from 78th St. into the Louis Armstrong Middle School cafeteria where the meeting took place.

“Play Street! Play Street!” chanted the crowd as they cheered, clapped and stomped to show their support.

Officials from the city Department of Health, Department of Transportation, Fire Department, and the Police Department spoke in support of the play-street initiative, along with Councilman Danny Dromm (D-Jackson Heights), Councilwoman Julissa Ferreras (D-East Elmhurst) and state Sen. Jose Peralta (D-Jackson Heights).

Many were overwhelmed by the number of people who showed up to the meeting to support the cause.

“I want to applaud each and every one of you here tonight because this is the first time that I’ve seen a community board meeting this packed in a long time,” Peralta said. “I want to lend my support to Councilman Danny Dromm and the concept of extending that 78th St. play street. I’m here to urge the community board to consider this, vote for this, because it’s seriously needed in our area.”

In terms of available park space, city officials rank Jackson Heights 50th out of 51 community districts, which means local children have little open space to play in the neighborhood. For the last two years, the green alliance has run a play-street program during Sundays in June, closing one block of 78th St. between Northern Blvd. and 34th Ave. to through traffic during the day, a common practice in the city during the summer.

But this year, when the alliance applied to extend the program from one to seven days a week throughout July and August, the community board’s transportation committee said no.

That angered some people in the community, many of whom expressed their anger at Thursday night’s meeting.

“You’ve all been hearing for at least 50 years that we’re starved for open space in Jackson Heights,” said Donovan Finn, a member of the alliance. “The [city’s] target number of children per playground is 1,250. In Jackson Heights we have 14,000 children under the age of 17. Under the age of 5 we have 5,000. Parks are an issue in the community… This is a zero-cost solution to the lack of park space in Jackson Heights. There is nowhere else to do it.”
Assemblyman Michael DenDekker (D-Jackson Heights) pointed out that the initiative was a trial program.

“You try it out for a couple of months. If it doesn’t work, you switch it back to the way it was, but you don’t know if it works until you try it,” he said.

But some board members fear a near-summer-long play street will cause traffic congestion in the neighborhood even though all relevant city agencies appeared at the meeting supporting the play street.

Transportation Committee Member Martin Maier, one of the dissenting votes, recommended taking the children to play at Joseph Pulitzer Middle School playground. Stephen Kulhanek, chair of the transportation committee, said he was concerned about the play street being 24 hours a day.

“I was concerned over the 24-hour nature of the street as well as the ability of the police and fire department to do their jobs appropriately,” he said. “What is going to happen overnight? Will it encourage inappropriate behavior there? But going forward, I certainly have every hope and desire that it works great. The community needs additional park space and this is a very creative way to try to create additional space.”

Dromm, whose victorious November campaign dealt largely with advocating for more park space, said he was pleased with the board’s vote and although the final say goes to the Department of Transportation, he thinks the measure will be approved.

“It was a great victory for the kids in Jackson Heights,” he said.

Queens Tribune: Dromm Endorses Avella For State Senate

From Queens Tribune: By Domenick Rafter


Democrats scored a top recruit last weekend for a State Senate race they nearly won two years ago. Former City Councilman Tony Avella (D-Bayside) announced his intention to run for the State Senate seat currently held by the last Republican state legislator in Queens, Sen. Frank Padavan (R-Bellerose).


Avella was flanked by other prominent Queens Democrats, including Assemblyman David Weprin (D-Little Neck) and Councilman Daniel Dromm (D-Jackson Heights), who gave Avella their endorsement.

Times Ledger: Dromm Supports Avella for State Senate



Former City Councilman Tony Avella announced Sunday amid a sea of supporters that he will challenge state Sen. Frank Padavan (R-Bellerose) for his seat in this fall’s election.


At Avella’s kick-off, Padavan drew criticism from other politicians, including Councilman Danny Dromm (D-Jackson Heights).

“Tony Avella is honest, upfront and independent,” Dromm said. “He has worked hard for this community. If anybody can beat Frank Padavan, that’s Tony Avella.”


Streetsblog: "Dromm Has Real Understanding of Issues"

From Streetsblog:
Queens City Council District 25
“Helen Sears is a lackluster incumbent who seems to believe that renegade cyclists are the big problem on the traffic-choked, auto-oriented streets of Jackson Heights. Daniel Dromm showed a real understanding of transportation and urban environmental issues at T.A.’s candidate debate. Word has it, Dromm has a decent shot at beating the incumbent. I’d love to see him win it”

NY Daily News Endorses Daniel Dromm

From NY Daily News:
Cream of the Council crop:
The people who should represent you at City Hall

Herewith the Daily News guide to those City Council candidates whose primary victories tomorrow hold the greatest promise of raising the low quality of the municipal legislature:

District 25(Jackson Heights, East Elmhurst, Elmhurst, LeFrak City, Corona):
Danny Dromm is a veteran teacher, Democratic district leader and head of the Queens Pride Committee. He has multiples of the energy of incumbent Helen Sears.

El Diario Endorses Daniel Dromm

We like Dromm’s aggressive stance on opening a center in his district. We also like his sensitivity to immigrant issues, including challenges for English Language Learners, and his overall political position: that in order to bring about change, one must affect the political structure.

DANIEL DROMM FOR DISTRICT 25
From El Diario:
One of the competitive electoral races in which New York City voters can have an impact is in City Council District 25 in Queens.

There, Daniel Dromm, a veteran educator and activist, is leading a spirited campaign against incumbent Helen Sears to represent neighborhoods like Jackson Heights, Elmhurst and Corona. District 25 is 46 percent Hispanic.

Sears has several noteworthy accomplishments. For example, Sears was one of the co-sponsors of legislation that created a commission to study the possibility of opening day labor centers. As El Diario-La Prensa frequently reports on, these centers are considered crucial for preventing day laborers from being exploited and for addressing community concerns about workers gathering on the streets.

But with the lack of follow up to recommendations issued by the day labor commission, we like Dromm’s aggressive stance on opening a center in his district. We also like his sensitivity to immigrant issues, including challenges for English Language Learners, and his overall political position: that in order to bring about change, one must affect the political structure.

Times-Ledger Newspapers Endorse Daniel Dromm for City Council

TimesLedger is giving its endorsement to Dromm, who has proven to be a passionate fighter for issues important to the community and is expected to be a more visible member of the Council if elected.

District 25: Danny Dromm
In the three-way race in District 25, voters will choose between the two-term incumbent Councilwoman Helen Sears; Danny Dromm, a school teacher and community activist; and Stanley Kalathara, an immigration lawyer who is a relative newcomer to local politics.

Sears is running on the strength of her experience in the Council as a budget negotiator and has defended her vote to extend term limits by saying more than eight years is needed to complete long-term capital projects.

Dromm has touted his history as an activist on gay rights and immigration issues as well as his knowledge of education after decades of teaching in city schools, while Kalathara has focused largely on Sears’ vote in favor of extending term limits.

TimesLedger is giving its endorsement to Dromm, who has proven to be a passionate fighter for issues important to the community and is expected to be a more visible member of the Council if elected.